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THE ORIGIN OF NAMES

- C -

CAMERON
Zak Cameron
Coghlan 2000 - to date
From the Scottish surname. The Camerons were one of the great Highland Clans, deriving their name from an ancestor with a ‘crooked nose’ - Gaelic 'cam shron'.

CAMILLA
Laura Sophie Camilla Klitz 1988 - to date
Feminine form of the old Roman family name Camillus. According to Virgil, Camilla was the name of a warrior maiden, who was Queen of the Volscians and fought in the army of Aeneas.

CANDICE
Candice
Thiesen 1985 - to date
A re-spelling of the ancient Ethiopian name Candace, the hereditary name of a long line of Queens of Ethiopia. The spelling may have derived from the Latin 'canditia' meaning ‘whiteness’.

CAROLINE
Caroline Phoebe Klitz 1933 - to date
Caroline Wendy Klitz 1954 - to date
Form of Latin or Italian 'Carolina'. Feminine form of Carolus - Charles.

CARL / KARL / CHARLES
Frederich Carl 1768 - 1770
Charles 1810 - 1864
Frederick Charles 1837 - ?
Charles John 1843 - 1907
Norman Leslie Charles 1888 - 1956
Charles Melville 1885 - 1959
Charles Raymond Lillington 1907 - 1996
Charles Greville 1914 - 1947
Simon Charles
Molden 1977 - to date
Charles Joseph
Landeta 1989 - to date
Karl 1807 - 1867
Heinrich Karl Walter Heinz 1926 - 1985
Karl Ludwig 1888 - ?

Carl is the variant spelling of Karl, the German for Charles.
Charles, from the French but originally a Germanic word meaning ’man’. The name originally owed its popularity in Europe to the Frankish leader, Charlemagne, who in 800 established himself as Holy Roman Emperor. The name continued a succession of Holy Roman emperors and there were 10 Kings of France with the name.
It was introduced into Britain by Mary Queen of Scots who had been brought up in France. She named her son Charles James who later became James I of England. His son and grandson both reigned as King Charles and thus the name became established in the monarchy. In the 19th Century the popularity of the name was further increased by the story of ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’.

CARMEL
Natalie Carmel Elaine Klitz 1982 - to date
Of early Christian origin referring to ‘Our Lady of Carmel’ a title of the Virgin Mary. Carmel probably means God’s Vineyard, in Hebrew and is the name of a hill in the Holy Land whose population of hermits, in the very early Christian times, was later organised into the Carmelite order of Monks.

CECILE
Nora Cecile Louise Klitz 1888 - 1889
(Cecilia) is regarded as the Patron Saint of Music.

CELIA
Celia Roberta
Blackwell 1946 - to date
Feminine of the Old Roman name Caelius probably derived from 'caelum' meaning 'heaven'. Introduced to the English speaking world in Shakespeare’s As You Like It.

CHARLOTTE
Gertrude Charlotte Klitz 1925 - ?
French feminine diminutive of Charles, used in England since the 17th Century but more popular in the 18th and 19th Centuries, in part due to Queen Charlotte 1744 - 1818, wife of George III and also of Charlotte Bronte 1816 - 1855.

CLAIRE
Claire Marie
Blundell 1951 - to date
French form of Clara, introduced by the Normans.
Clara - Post-classical Latin name from the feminine of' clarus' meaning 'famous'.

CHRISTINE / CHRISTINA
Betty Christine Klitz 1929 - to date
Christina Lee
Harding 1964 - to date
Christina Phoebe
Harding 1990 - to date
Simone Christine Klitz 1976 - to date
Christine is from the French. A form of Christina. Christina simplified form of Latin Christiana.

CHRISTOPHER / CHRISTOPHE
Johann Christophe 1742 - 1818
Christopher James 1894 - 1958
Stuart Christopher 1952 - to date
Christopher
Marchant 1937 - to date
Christopher
Bacon 1981 - to date
Nicholas Christopher
Green 1989 - to date
Christopher Heinrich 1986 - to date
From the Greek, 'Khristopheros' – meaning ‘he who bore Christ’. This was popular among early Christians. A later, over-literal interpretation of the name gave rise to the legend of a saint who actually bore the Christ-child over a stream.
Saint Christopher is the patron saint of travellers.

CONRAD
Philipp Conrad 1766 - 1770
Conrad is the English version of the German, Konrad – bold + counsel. Used occasionally in the Middle Ages in honour of a 10th Century bishop of Constance in Switzerland. Re-introduced for modern use in the 19th Century.

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