Home - Foreword - Georg Philipp - Piano Business - Lymington - Trees - Related Topics
Alphabetical Links

EMAIL TO ANN

 

THE ORIGIN OF NAMES

- N -

NATALIE / NATHALIE
Natalie Carmel Elaine Klitz 1982 - to date
Nathalie Klitz 1985 - to date
French form of the Russian name Natalya, originally from the Latin 'natalis' (dies) meaning 'birthday'. St. Natalia was an inhabitant of Nicomedia who is said to have given succour to the martyrs, including her husband, Adrian, who suffered there in persecutions in 303. She was regarded as a Christian Saint, although was not herself martyred.

NEVILLE
John Neville 1910 - 1989
From the English surname, derived from the baronial name from any of several places in Normandy called Neville or Neuville meaning ‘new settlement’. First used as a given name in the 17th Century.

NICHOLAS
Nicholas Stuart Molden 1974 - to date
Nicholas Christopher
Green 1989 - to date
From the Greek name Nikolaos composed of 'nike' meaning 'victory' and 'laos' meaning 'people'.
St. Nicholas was a 4th Century bishop of Myra in Lycia, about whom virtually nothing is known except a large amount of legend grew up around him. He became patron saint of Russia, as well as of children, sailors, merchants and pawnbrokers. His Feast Day is 06 December and among the many roles assigned to him is the bringer of Christmas presents in the guise of Santa Claus! (An alteration of the German form of his name Sankt Niklaus, or the Dutch form Sinte Claus).

NICOLE
Jaclyn NicoleMalcolm 1990 - to date
French feminine form of Nicholas, now increasingly used as an exotic form of Nicola.

NIGEL
Nigel Philip 1956 - to date
Anglicised form of the medieval name, Nigellus which is possibly from the latin 'niger', meaning 'black'. The name is found in Medieval records but this form was probably not used in everyday language until the 19th Century.

NORA
Nora Cecile Louise Klitz 1888 - 1889
Short form of names such as Honora or Leonora. Sometimes spelled Norah.

NORMAN
Norman Leslie Charles 1888 - 1956
Composed of 'nord' meaning 'north' + man that is ‘Norseman’. The name was in use in England before the Conquest and was reinforced by the Norman invaders themselves

back to top - Origin of names - N